Element
Ineffective
Minimally Effective
Effective
Highly Effective
Teacher Interaction with Students
Teacher interaction with at least some students is negative, demeaning, sarcastic, or inappropriate to the age or culture of the students. Students exhibit disrespect for the teacher.
Teacher-student interactions are generally appropriate but may reflect occasional inconsistencies, favoritism, or disregard for students’ cultures. Students exhibit only minimal respect for the teacher.
Teacher-student interactions are friendly and demonstrate general caring and respect. Such interactions are appropriate to the age and cultures of the students. Students exhibit respect for the teacher.
Teacher interactions with students reflect genuine respect and caring for individuals as well as groups of students. Students appear to trust the teacher with sensitive information.
Student Interactions with Other Students
Student interactions are characterized by conflict, sarcasm, and put-downs.
Students do not demonstrate disrespect for one another.
Student interactions are generally polite and respectful.
Students demonstrate genuine caring for one another and monitor one another’s treatment of peers, correcting classmates respectfully when needed.

Element
Ineffective
Minimally Effective
Effective
Highly Effective
Importance of the Content
Teacher or students convey a negative attitude toward the content, suggesting that it is not important or has been mandated by others.
Teacher communicates importance of the work but with little conviction and only minimal apparent buy-in by the students.
Teacher conveys genuine enthusiasm for the content, and students demonstrate consistent commitment to its value.
Students demonstrate through their active participation, curiosity, and taking initiative that they value the importance of the content.
Expectations for Learning and Achievement
Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey low expectations for at least some students.
Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey only modest expectations for student learning and achievement.
Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey high expectations for most students.
Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey high expectations for all students. Students appear to have internalized these expectations.
Student Pride in Work
Students demonstrate little or no pride in their work. They seem to be motivated by the desire to complete a task rather than to do high-quality work.
Students minimally accept the responsibility to do good work but invest little of their energy into its quality.
Students accept the teacher’s insistence on work of high quality and demonstrate pride in that work.
Students demonstrate attention to detail and take obvious pride in their work, initiating improvements in it by, for example, revising drafts on their own or helping peers.

Element
Ineffective
Minimally Effective
Effective
Highly Effective
Management of Instructional Groups
Students not working with the teacher are not productively engaged in learning.
Students in only some groups are productively engaged in learning while unsupervised by the teacher.
Small-group work is well organized, and most students are productively engaged in learning while unsupervised by the teacher.
Small-group work is well organized, and students are productively engaged at all times, with students assuming responsibility for productivity.
Management of Transitions
Transitions are chaotic, with much time lost between activities or lesson segments.
Only some transitions are efficient, resulting in some loss of instructional time.
Transitions occur smoothly, with little loss of instructional time.
Transitions are seamless, with students assuming responsibility in ensuring their efficient operation.
Management of Materials and Supplies
Materials and supplies are handled inefficiently, resulting in significant loss of instructional time.
Routines for handling materials and supplies function moderately well, but with some loss of instructional time.
Routines for handling materials and supplies occur smoothly, with little loss of instructional time.
Routines for handling materials and supplies are seamless, with students assuming some responsibility for smooth operation.
Performance of Non-Instructional Duties
Considerable instructional time is lost in performing non-instructional duties.
Systems for performing
non-instructional duties are only fairly efficient, resulting in some loss of instructional time.
Efficient systems for performing non-instructional duties are in place, resulting in minimal loss of instructional time.
Systems for performing non-instructional duties are well established, with students assuming considerable responsibility for efficient operation.
Supervision of Volunteers and Paraprofessionals
Volunteers and paraprofessionals have no clearly defined duties and are idle most of the time.
Volunteers and paraprofessionals are productively engaged during portions of the class time but require frequent supervision.
Volunteers and paraprofessionals are productively and independently engaged during the entire class.
Volunteers and paraprofessionals make a substantive contribution to the classroom environment.

Element
Ineffective
Minimally Effective
Effective
Highly Effective
Expectations
No standards of conduct appear to have been established, or students are confused as to what the standards are.
Standards of conduct appear to have been established, and most students seem to understand them.
Standards of conduct are clear to all students.
Standards of conduct are clear to all students and appear to have been developed with student participation.
Monitoring of Student Behavior
Student behavior is not monitored, and teacher is unaware of what the students are doing.
Teacher is generally aware of student behavior but may miss the activities of some students.
Teacher is alert to student behavior at all times.
Monitoring by teacher is subtle and preventive. Students monitor their own and peer’s behavior, correcting one another respectfully.
Response to Student Behavior
Teacher does not respond to misbehavior, or the response is inconsistent, is overly repressive, or does not respect the student’s dignity.
Teacher attempts to respond to student misbehavior but with uneven results, or there are no major infractions of the rules.
Teacher response to misbehavior is appropriate and successful and respects the student’s dignity, or student behavior is generally appropriate.
Teacher response to misbehavior is highly effective and sensitive to students’ individual needs, or students’ behavior is entirely appropriate.

Element
Ineffective
Minimally Effective
Effective
Highly Effective
Safety and Accessibility
The classroom is unsafe, or learning is not accessible to some students.
The classroom is safe; and at least essential learning is accessible to most students.
The classroom is safe, and learning is equally accessible to all students.
The classroom is safe, and students themselves ensure that all learning is equally accessible to all students.
Arrangement of Furniture and Use of Physical Space
The furniture arrangement hinders the learning activities, or the teacher makes poor use of physical space.
Teacher uses physical resources adequately. The furniture may be adjusted for a lesson but with limited effectiveness.
Teacher uses physical resources skillfully, and the furniture arrangement is a resource for learning activities.
Both teacher and students use physical resources easily and skillfully, and students adjust the furniture to advance their learning.